Child Development

Children develop intellectually, physically and socially, step by step, in a progressive manner. Skills are
learned gradually as a child moves through the stages of development. In order to provide an age
appropriate program with activities that enhance the numerous stages of growth and development in
children, the adult should have a good understanding of where the child is coming from, where the child
is at currently, and where he or she is heading in the near future, developmentally.

The following information will provide a basic overview of patterns of development in the growing child.

The 7 Year Old Child
The seven year old is beginning to enjoy playing by herself. She loves to color and cut especially. A
craft box is a treasure to the seven year old. She can be somewhat obsessive in her play interests. She
wants to collect all the Beanie Babies, have all of Barbie's accessories, or action figures. She is able to
plan her play better and begins to invent things. She loves arts and crafts and making things.

The seven year old loves table and board games and jigsaw puzzles. He is a bit less insistent on
winning every time and so will take on more complicated games such as Monopoly and magic tricks. He
still loves his bicycle though, and outdoor play is favored over indoors. He loves to watch TV and some
movies though he hates anything romantic. He is beginning to read more on his own but parents should
continue to read to him whenever they have the opportunity.

Patterns of Development
Withdraw and are often silent, brooding, sulking and moody. They frequently feel that other children are
picking on them or don’t like them.

Worry about everything – family illness, wars, tornadoes or whether the family has enough money.

Expect to be treated fairly and are easily hurt when they feel they have been treated unfairly.

Are good listeners and good students. They love to think, explore and discuss.

Have better control of there own body, tempers and thoughts.

Likely to complain than rejoice
maybe moody
withdraws from combat and from other people
likes to be alone
likes to protect his/her things
likes to watch T.V., and listen to radio
hands are very busy touching and exploring
is becoming more discriminating
often demands too much of himself/herself
can become suddenly exhausted
may feel that everyone else is against him/her
shows caution
able to print several sentences with individual differences on size of printing
makes use of both upper and lowercase letters
able to saw a straight line in carpentry
able to use both hands at the piano

Cognitive Development
uses a vocabulary of several thousand words
demonstrates a longer attention span
uses serious, logical thinking; is thoughtful and reflective
able to understand reasoning and make the right decisions
can tell time; knows the days, months, and seasons
can describe points of similarity between two objects
begins to grasp that letters represent the sounds that form words
able to solve more complex problems
individual learning style becomes more clear-cut

Language Development
uses a vocabulary of several thousand words
demonstrates a longer attention span
uses serious, logical thinking; is thoughtful and reflective
able to understand reasoning and make the right decisions
can tell time; knows the days, months, and seasons
can describe points of similarity between two objects
begins to grasp that letters represent the sounds that form words
able to solve more complex problems
individual learning style becomes more clear-cut
Should have mastered the consonants s-z, r, voiceless th, ch, wh, and the soft g as in George
Should handle opposite analogies easily: girl-boy, man-woman, flies-swims, blunt-sharp short-long,
sweet-sour, etc
Understands such terms as: alike, different, beginning, end, etc
Should be able to tell time to quarter hour
Should be able to do simple reading and to write or print many words

Physical Development
hand-eye coordination is well developed
has good balance
can execute simple gymnastic movements, such as somersaults
becoming more coordinated in his gross motor play, becoming a good swimmer, a good batter, and an
expert tree climber

Social/Emotional Development
The seven year old has defiant moments. She wants to know why she has to do something. She may
call her mother mean and run to her room to sulk but is less likely to physically strike her parent now.  If
things don't go her way when playing with friends she will quit and go play by herself. When she is
disciplined she accepts it but is deeply disturbed by being in trouble. She doesn't get along that well with
her siblings or with other children. She fights and argues. Separating fighting children
for a period of time is often required. She usually gets along better during outdoor play rather than
indoors.

The seven year old is better able to empathize with others. She will cry at a sad story
or movie. However, she can control her crying better now and is more likely to cry because she is
disappointed or overwhelmed with tension. Overall tensional manifestations are lower at seven.
The seven year old wants to be perfect and is very hard on himself when he doesn't live up to his high
goals. He only wants to show his parents his 100 papers and is deeply concerned about and ashamed
of his mistakes. He doesn't take correction
well and will try to hide his mistakes. He is very persistent. Once he starts something he feels he must
finish and will become upset if he is not allowed to. He tends to talk non-stop from morning to night,
asking question after question to his parents. He is less selfish. He can share better. He wants to be
good and to please his parents and teacher. He is proud of his family, his classroom, his abilities. But,
he can also be very critical. He likes to plan his day.

He desires to be perfect and is quite self-critical
worries more; may have low self-confidence
tends to complain; has strong emotional reactions
understands the difference between right and wrong
takes direction well; needs punishment only rarely
avoids and withdraws from adults
is a better loser and less likely to place blame
waits for her turn in activities
starts to feel guilt and shame

Ideas for Care Givers
Help all children feel like winners while working or playing together

Read with children. Discuss things that the children read of have seen

Allow children to finish what they have started

Introduce children to music or a musical instrument

Children learn best by doing. Try to demonstrate instructions for activities or projects.

Provide projects, games, crafts, or activities in which children use their large and small muscles. Use
craft projects that beginners can complete. Do not expect perfection from the children.

Encourage cooperative rather than competitive games. Help all children feel like winners.

Encourage children to collect things like shells, stamps, or flowers.

Encourage pretend play because it is still an important learning experience.

Make time for running, hopping, skipping, jumping, and climbing.

Encourage children to dance or skip to music.

Encourage children to talk about their feelings while working or playing together

Help ease the tendency for self-criticism by stressing what he’s learned rather than how the final
product looks.

Be patient and understanding of volatile emotions and moods.

Take advantage of his eagerness to learn by asking open-ended, thought-provoking questions, doing
puzzles, and playing thinking games.

Initiate discussions about right vs. wrong.

Provide opportunities for independent decision-making.

Teach Responsibility:  Chore Chart
Pick up Toys
Fold Dishtowels and Washcloths
Match Socks
Put small items in the garbage
Give food to pets
Water indoor plants
Load the dishwasher
Answer the telephone
Sweep a deck/patio/porch
Wipe the bathroom sink
Put forks and spoons away
Put their own clothes in the drawer
Sort laundry into color piles
Use a hand-held vacuum
Take out Garbage
Set the table
Clear the table
Vacuum an area rug
Clean the inside of the car
Empty the dishwasher  
Put away clean dry dishes
All the DAZE Productions
Endless ideas for "all the daze" you spend with children.
c. Marcia Arpin
www.alltheDAZE.com
established July, 1, 2002
Happy DAZE!